Researchers Report Cloning Advance For Producing Stem Cells

Scientists reported this week in the journal Cell that they had used somatic cell nuclear transfer techniques to create a source of embryonic stem cells from the skin cells of a patient. George Daley, director of the stem cell transplantation program at Boston Children’s Hospital, and Josephine Johnston of the Hastings Center discuss the research.

Researchers Report Cloning Advance For Producing Stem Cells

Scientists reported this week in the journal Cell that they had used somatic cell nuclear transfer techniques to create a source of embryonic stem cells from the skin cells of a patient. George Daley, director of the stem cell transplantation program at Boston Children’s Hospital, and Josephine Johnston of the Hastings Center discuss the research.

Analyzing The Language Of Suicide Notes To Help Save Lives

About a third of people who attempt suicide leave a note. John Pestian and others at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital are merging psychology and computer analysis to see if such notes can help diagnose suicidal tendencies in the living.

Seeking A Grain Of Truth In "Whole Grain" Labels

Whole wheat, stone-ground, multi-grain. Have food labels got you confused? Joanne Slavin, a nutrition professor at the University of Minnesota, and David Ludwig, a pediatrician and obesity doctor at Boston Children’s Hospital, discuss the meaning of “whole grain,” and whether intact grains like wheat berries pack more nutritional punch than their ground-up counterparts, such as whole wheat flour.

Seeking A Grain Of Truth In "Whole Grain" Labels

Whole wheat, stone-ground, multi-grain. Have food labels got you confused? Joanne Slavin, a nutrition professor at the University of Minnesota, and David Ludwig, a pediatrician and obesity doctor at Boston Children’s Hospital, discuss the meaning of “whole grain,” and whether intact grains like wheat berries pack more nutritional punch than their ground-up counterparts, such as whole wheat flour.

Scared To Death… Literally

Earthquakes, terrorist attacks and muggings have all scared people to death. Sporting events, too, sometimes cause frenzied fans to drop dead. Neurologist Martin Samuels of Brigham and Women’s Hospital explains how positive or negative excitement can lead to a heart-stopping surge of adrenaline.