World’s Largest Neutrino Telescope Buried in Antarctic Ice

IceCube, the largest neutrino observatory on earth, covers one cubic kilometer of Antarctic ice. The detector is looking for high-energy neutrinos coming from deep space. Physicist Francis Halzen discusses the decision to build the telescope at the South Pole and how we can construct a map of the cosmos with neutrinos.

World’s Largest Volcano Discovered on Pacific Seafloor

Researchers discovered the largest volcano on earth a thousand miles off the coast of Japan. Tamu Massif rivals some of the biggest volcanoes found in the solar system. Volcanology researcher Kayla Iacovino discusses what this giant can tell us about the inside of our planet.

Communications Gear Hitches Ride With Lunar Probe

A satellite is scheduled to take off for the Moon Friday — carrying an instrument that could represent the future of deep space communication. Instead of sending data back to earth using radio waves, the Lunar Laser Communications Demonstration will use pulsed light waves.

A Cooler Pacific May Be Behind Recent Pause In Global Warming

The Earth’s average annual temperature has been rising for decades, but not in the last 15 years — colder winters and hotter summers notwithstanding. Now scientists offer evidence that this “pause” in average warming is because a cooler Pacific is temporarily taking up more heat than usual.

The ‘Consensus’ View: Kevin Trenberth’s Take On Climate Change

Climate skeptics point to 15 years of no warming trend as a reason to doubt global warming. But Kevin Trenberth at the National Center for Atmospheric Research can explain a good bit of that temperature plateau — and he argues the Earth has continued to warm appreciably, even though our thin blanket of atmosphere hasn’t.

Swinging CO2 Levels Show The Earth Is ‘Breathing’ More Deeply

Carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere cycle up and down as plants take it up in the summer and let some of it out in the winter. Over the past 50 years, these “breaths” have gotten larger, as plants in the Arctic are taking up more carbon dioxide during the warmer summers.

Swinging CO2 Levels Show The Earth Is ‘Breathing’ More Deeply

Carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere cycle up and down as plants take it up in the summer and let some of it out in the winter. Over the past 50 years, these “breaths” have gotten larger, as plants in the Arctic are taking up more carbon dioxide during the warmer summers.

Our Once And Future Oceans: Taking Lessons From Earth’s Past

Paleontologists have been spending a lot of time studying the Earth of 50 million years ago, which was much hotter than it is today. They’re hoping a glimpse into the planet’s geologic past will show them how the planet will respond to all the carbon dioxide we’re now putting into the air.